10 Things to Know About Babe Ruth

10 Things to Know About Babe Ruth

The Babe, as Babe Ruth was known, was one of the most recognizable names in Baseball. He also had quite the colorful life. More than 100 years ago, He made his major-league baseball entrance in a winning game for the Boston Red Sox over the Cleveland Naps. Let’s take a look at 10 random things

The Babe, as Babe Ruth was known, was one of the most recognizable names in Baseball. He also had quite the colorful life. More than 100 years ago, He made his major-league baseball entrance in a winning game for the Boston Red Sox over the Cleveland Naps. Let’s take a look at 10 random things that we at 777iGame found out about The Babe.

1. Ruth thought he was older than he actually was.
For the longest time, Ruth thought that his birth date was February 7, 1894. It was not until he had to file for a passport to head to Japan with an all-star team after the 1934 season that he checked his birth certificate and discovered that his birth date was February 6, 1895. This was almost a year than he thought his age was. Maybe out of tradition, or to avoid confusion on his part, he retained his February 7th birthday and did not take off a year from his known age.

2. He wasn’t an orphan
Most people think that Ruth was an orphan, since he went to St. Mary’s Industrial School for Orphans, Delinquent, Incorrigible and Wayward Boys in Baltimore, Maryland (Yes, during his time, there were schools like this. If they had that today, we all know where some of the people in 777iGame would have studied). Ruth was just Delinquent, Incorrigible and Wayward. His own parents were overwhelmed with Ruth so they sent him to Catholic School when Ruth was 7. The school would have had full guardianship of The Babe. But despite being wayward and delinquent, it was in this school that Babe Ruth discovered, and fell in love with Baseball. And on Valentine’s day in 1914, Ruth signed his contract with the Baltimore Orioles.

3. His Father died because of family.
Ruth’s father, George Herman Ruth Sr., was tending bar on August 1918 when a fight broke out between his brother in laws. He began to argue with one of his family members, they somehow ended up on the street where the fight continued. He fell and hit the back of his head, and passed away from a skull fracture.

4. His first wife died under mysterious circumstances.
After his rookie season, Ruth married Helen Woodford. They also adopted a daughter, who was rumored to be Ruth’s child from a mistress in 1922. Woodford was 16 when she married Ruth, and within a few years, they separated. One day in January 1929 faulty wiring caused a huge fire that swept through the home of dentist Edward Kinder and killed his wife, Helen Kinder. It wasn’t until days before the deceased interment that family and readers saw photos of her in a Boston paper and realized she was Helen Ruth.

5. He was a reckless driver and was jailed for it.
As fast as Ruth was in the field, he was even faster behind the wheel. He had a long list of traffic violations, accidents, and speeding tickets under his belt. But on June 8, 1921, in Manhattan, he was caught speeding for the second time in the same month and spent the night in jail. He was released the following day, 45 minutes after the start of the day’s game, and sped off with an escort to make it to the game.

6. Ruth was popular as a pitcher.
The Babe was immortalized for swatting 714 home runs and slugging .690, a current major0league record. But was also one of the Baseballs’ most dominant pitchers (left-handed) in 1910 and the following years. He played 6 seasons with the Red Sox and won 89 games, and helped the Red Sox gain 3 World Series wins. He only got to pitch for 5 games for the Yankees then he was switched to outfielder before the 1920 season when he was sold by the Red Sox.

7. The Babe pitched a no-hitter without retiring a single batter.
In 1917, he took the mound versus the Senators and walked their hitter, Ray Morgan. He fought with the umpire Brick Owens and got kicked out from the game. He punched the umpire at the back of the neck and Morgan was thrown out from trying to steal second base. Ruth was taken out from that game too. Ernie Shore replaced him and retired the next 26 batters.

8. He did not retire as a Yankee
The Babes career started in Boston, playing for the Red Sox. He was then sold to the New York Yankees and played with them until his performance started going down. He then went back to Boston in 1935 to play with the Braves, but after just 28 games, he retired his jersey because if declining performance.

9. But his last major league appearance was not as a player.
Babe Ruth returned to the field in June 1938 as a first base coach for the Brooklyn Dodgers. He maintained a public presence with exhibition games and batting practice sessions and was used by the Dodgers as PR to sell more tickets. The following year, Ruth was skipped over for the manager position, and he did not return that season.

10. Babe Ruth’s Wall of Fame
A year after The Babe retired, he was shortlisted as one of the five elected to the National Baseball Hall of Fame. Despite his status as a player, his name was left out of the ballot by a few members, and in terms of votes, he came in second to Cobb. His plaque in Copperstown, New York says he is Baseball’s “greatest drawing card”. Recently, the Hall of Fame opened an exhibit about Babe Ruth to celebrate his centennial of Ruth’s big league season.

We at 777iGame will try to give you more information on your favorite athletes from different sports and different generations. Visit our site regularly to see what we have for you.

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