Basic Baseball

Basic Baseball

We at 777iGame are warming up our seats as baseball season in the US has started. While some of us have already picked our favorites, we are quite sure that there are others who need a little help figuring out the terms you see when reading about baseball. So we at 777iGame, your favorite source

We at 777iGame are warming up our seats as baseball season in the US has started. While some of us have already picked our favorites, we are quite sure that there are others who need a little help figuring out the terms you see when reading about baseball. So we at 777iGame, your favorite source of all things sports, have decided to be a bit more helpful and help you (and some of us here, too) figure out what baseball pitches are.

Let’s talk about the most basic pitches we come across when watching baseball.

FASTBALLS – they have four-seam, two-seam, forkballs, cutter and splitter.
BREAKING BALLS- these are curveballs, sliders, slurves and screwballs
CHANGEUPS- these are changeups, palmballs and circle changeups

This seems a bit tricky to learn, but the fastest way to figure this out is to watch the player. Each pitcher you will see will most often use just a few of these pitches. It helps to check for this before any game. Now, when you identify a pitch, you watch out for the three basic tips:
1. Speed
2. Movement (direction of the ball)
3. Break (if there is a sudden change in the direction of the ball)

Now that we have covered the basics, lets look at the basic identifiers for your pitchers. A four-seam fastball goes from 85 to 100 mph and is the fastest pitch that is also the most straight. There is little to no movement, a direct pitch, if you may say. A two-seam fastball is also called a sinker. Its slightly slower clocking in at around 80 to 90 mph, and the direction of the ball is downward. It can also sometimes run in on a right handed hitter. The cutter, clocking in at 85 to 95 mph breaks away from a right handed hitter. It is a combination of a slider as well as a fastball. The splitter, which goes at 80 to 90 mph, goes straight as well, but breaks downwards suddenly just before reaching the plate. Lastly, the forkball, which is slower than the rest at 75 to 85 mph, is kind of like a splitter, but with a more gradual movement.

Are you following us so far? We at 777iGame have drawing skills that are not worth posting, but it helps to imagine this if you picture the ball flying towards you. That way, you can see the direction and the movement of the ball.

Now, a curveball, or what we call a 12-6 curveball, is the top to bottom movement – kind of like in a clock, from the 12 position to the 6 o clock position. The slider, meanwhile, is between a fastball and a curve, and it moves at 80 to 90 mph and breaks down and away from a right hand hitter.

We also have a slurve, which can be best described by using the clock analogy again, from an 11 o clock to a 5 o clock position, having a more lateral movement. A screwball, like the clock is opposite from the slurve- it moves from 1 o clock to 7 o clock.

The changeup is basically a fastball, having the same arm movement, but slower.

There is also the Palmball, which clocks in at 65 to 75mph, and is called as such because the ball is tightly gripped in your palm. The ball is slower, but thrown in the same arm motion as a changeup, and slower than a fastball. Lastly, there is the circle changeup, which is a changeup but with a 1 o clock to 7 o clock movement.

We at 777iGame really rely on comparing the moves to the clock to identify the various pitches we see. And as we mentioned earlier, getting to know the players and their signature moves will make it so much easier for you to call out the pitch while watching the game in a sports bar and impress anyone within earshot. So if you want more tips on learning about sports, remember that 777iGame has your back.

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